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Jesse Stewart
Writing Festival Finalist

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11 QUESTIONS with Jesse Stewart - Short Screenplay Finalist

1. What is your screenplay about?

After being diagnosed with a dangerous and unheard-of medical condition, a persistent young man is forced to reevaluate the world and change his habits or he'll be forced to fall on his sword, literally.

2. Why should your script be made into a film?

It has a unique blend of humor and somberness (hopefully that's a real word) that both entertains and provides a new perspective to twenty first century health issues. Because laughter is the best medicine, right? *studio audience laughs*

3. How long have you been writing screenplays?

I wrote plenty of short stories and other little things for years but after the thrill of writing little short films to be done with friends for assignments in high school, I enrolled at Colorado Film School in 2010 and have been writing scripts nonstop since then.

4. What film have you seen the most in your life?

If I'm being honest, probably Space Jam. Don't judge me. Or maybe Fantasia. I always mix those two up.

5. What artists in the film industry would you love to work with?

Either top-tier actors like Daniel Day-Lewis or Joaquin Phoenix or the ever-so-clever writer/director Edgar Wright. Or Jon Brion, the man with a melody. Or maybe Dog the Bounty Hunter or, uh...what was the question again?

6. How many screenplays have you written?

I try to write as many as I can, at least one short from start to finish every couple of months. But then there are always a bucketload that are being constantly tweaked and rewritten. I keep my scripts in a shrimp bucket when I'm not working on them, so I can fish for ideas.

7. Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

Not in a Starbucks, in any context. I'd like to have a few great shorts under my belt by that time and hopefully a nice, low-budget feature on their heels.

8. Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

I push myself to write something that could be called 'decent' everyday in as many different mediums as possible. Whether that be a music review or a short script or a dumb tweet, imagination is a muscle that must constantly be tested so it retains its elasticity. #ImaginationInflation

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Music is an endless source of inspiration and auto racing is an underrated source of empathy and mental sharpness. And chicken noodle soup, that stuff is great.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Script Contest?

It's invaluable to receive feedback on a script from people who have absolutely no connection to you other than a professional one. They will give you super honest feedback because they don't have to preserve any courtesy or friendship with you. Though Canadians are usually pretty friendly anyway.

11. Any advice or tips you'd like to pass on to other writers?

The concept of 'fake it until you make it' may work in many fields but certainly not writing. It's like World War One. You need to be working in the trenches every single day until you get what you need, and you don't always know what that is when you start out. It's like Paths of Glory, but instead of socio-political drama it's self-loathing and caffeine.

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Jesse Stewart